What Causes Strawberry Legs And How To Get Rid Of It?

Summer is arrived, which means you're most likely showing a little more skin. As our gams finally receive their due, pants become shorts, maxi dresses become minis, and skirts become minis. Short hemlines, on the other hand, may be undesirable to those whose legs are spotted, bumpy, or spotty. Let's learn more about how a dermatologist treats and prevents skin diseases known as "strawberry legs."


What Are 'Strawberry Legs,' Exactly?


Strawberry legs refers to a dotty appearance of the legs, mainly around the hair follicles. The dots depict the buildup of common skin elements in and around the hair and oil glands. Keratin is a type of protein that is found in (the main protein in the skin)

* Melanin is a pigment found in the skin (the source of pigment)

* Sebum is a type of oil that is produced by (natural oil of the skin)

* Bacteria are microorganisms (often, normal skin flora)


The name "strawberry legs" refers to the dark pores and dots or red pimples that emerge on the lower thighs and resemble strawberry seeds. Strawberry legs are not hazardous in terms of health, but they are ugly.


Strawberry Legs: What Causes Them and How to Treat Them


four most prevalent causes of strawberry legs


1. Clogged Pores


Clogged pores on your legs are just as common as clogged pores on your face. Because of heredity and thicker body hair, some people have larger pores, and while the pores themselves aren't inherently irritating, they can become problematic when they become blocked with germs, dead skin, and sebum. When clogged pores on the legs are exposed to air, the debris dries up and darkens, in the same way that a blackhead on the face does.


Treat with: Chemical and physical exfoliation.


Exfoliation, which is part of your facial skincare routine, can be used to cure congested pores on the legs or anyplace else on the body. My personal favourite for my patients is chemical exfoliation, which uses chemicals such as acids and retinols to stimulate skin cell turnover and clear pores. This eliminates keratin, oils, and other skin detritus gently, opening up pores and follicles and preventing secondary bacterial buildup. Acne and folliculitis bacteria grow in oil-clogged hair follicles, so eliminating that build-up is critical.


Look for a body wash or moisturiser that contains alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs) and beta-hydroxy acids (BHAs), notably glycolic acid and salicylic acid, to exfoliate dead skin cells and other debris that create clogged pores. These acids gently exfoliate the skin by minimising the'stickiness' of dead or dying skin cells. This helps to open up the pores while also giving the skin a great textural shift and radiance.


2. Folliculitis


Folliculitis is a skin disorder that causes inflamed or infected hair follicles. The most common sign is little red pimples around the hair follicles. Hair loss or scarring in the affected area may occur in extreme situations. The majority of instances, however, are small and normally resolve within a few days.


It's crucial to note that folliculitis is a catch-all term for inflammation of the hair follicle. This can be contagious due to microorganisms like staphylococcus or sterile due to oil buildup or shaving stress.


Treat with: Antibiotics, both oral and topical.


Folliculitis is a "tricky condition" to treat, which is why you should consult a dermatologist before trying any at-home therapies. Folliculitis can be sterile, with red, pus-filled pimples forming as a result of causes like clogged pores and shaving. They can, however, indicate a superficial skin infection caused by bacteria or yeast such as staph and pityrosporum.


While the former can be treated with over-the-counter medications, the latter may require prescriptions for antibiotic creams or even pills to resolve. A simple swab can be used by a dermatologist to assess whether or not organisms should be targeted. If there are, it might save you a lot of time and effort in developing successful at-home habits.


Treat with: Antibacterial skincare.


At-home treatments range from lifestyle changes to skincare. To begin, change out of your sweaty training clothes and shower as quickly as possible. In the shower, lather up with antibacterial soap.


Treat with: Laser hair removal treatment.


laser hair removal


3. Keratosis Pilaris


Keratosis pilaris (KP), popularly known as "chicken skin," is a skin disorder characterised by the appearance of small bumps on the skin. Keratosis pilaris most usually affects the upper outer arms, however it can also affect the thighs. Keratin accumulation in the hair follicles causes this.


Treat with: Chemical exfoliation.


Chemical exfoliants, like clogged pores, are frequently efficient in the treatment of keratosis pilaris, but prescription-strength treatments may also be beneficial. Exfoliative acids are my first line of defence against keratosis pilaris. If those don't work, a prescription-grade retinoid may be an option, but only after consulting with a dermatologist.


While keratosis pilaris is usually a year-round condition, flare-ups are more likely in the winter when the skin is drier. Additionally, swimmers may aggravate the illness due to the dehydrating effects of chlorine and other pool chemicals.


4. Dry Skin


Dry skin, as previously indicated, contributes to a number of skin diseases, including strawberry legs. Dehydrated skin is more susceptible to irritation, especially during shaving. Dry skin on the lower legs is more prone to razor burn, keratosis pilaris, folliculitis, and plugged pores, all of which can result in a spotty appearance.


Treat with: Creams and moisturisers.


For severely dry skin, a daily moisturising body lotion containing ammonium lactate is an excellent place to start, especially if it is scaly. Ichthyosis, or dry, scaly, or thickened skin, may not usually respond to regular creams and moisturisers, thus a dual-purpose formulation may be necessary. Because there is a thicker layer of dead skin on the surface, moisturising alone isn't always adequate. Exfoliating lotions gradually remove that layer, allowing richer moisturisers to penetrate deeper into the healthier layers beneath.


In conclusion


dermatologist

Dr Niketa Sonavane is a Celebrity Dermatologist and founder of Ambrosia Aesthetics, Mumbai. She is considered as one of the best dermatologist in Mumbai.
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