Is it worth using Prozac (fluoxetine) as an antidepressant? Find out More!

Prozac is an antidepressant. It's also known as fluoxetine, which is its generic name. Prozac (fluoxetine) is efficient in improving your state of mind, energy levels, sleep, and appetite. This medication is likewise valuable in lessening fear, undesirable considerations, and tension.


Prozac (Fluoxetine) is readily accessible as a liquid, tablet, capsule, and long-acting capsule with delayed release. It is advisable for grown-ups and can sometimes be used for children aged 10 years and older.


What is Prozac (Fluoxetine) used for?

Prozac (Fluoxetine) is an FDA-approved medication. It has been used to treat major depressive disorder (in people aged eight and up), panic attacks, eating disorders (bulimia and binge-eating disorders), bipolar disorder, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. For treatment-restricted depression, Prozac (Fluoxetine) is also used in conjunction with olanzapine.

Prozac (fluoxetine) non-FDA-authorized applications incorporate social anxiety disorder (also known as social phobia), borderline personality disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, Raynaud phenomenon, and selective mutism.


Is Prozac (Fluoxetine) an SSRI?

Prozac (Fluoxetine) belongs to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) class of antidepressants. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered "selective" because of their little impact on dopamine or norepinephrine. They exert their therapeutic effect by inhibiting serotonin reuptake.


Prozac (fluoxetine) was the first SSRI to be sold in the United States. It has received significant interest among the press and has reduced the long-term stigma and dread of using antidepressants.


Over 100 million individuals globally take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).


One in ten people in the US and one in four women between 40 and 50 years old is supposed to take SSRI to improve their moods by enhancing their brain serotonin.


What Does Prozac (Fluoxetine) Do

These medications are supposed to operate by boosting serotonin levels, a mood-enhancing neurotransmitter in the brain. These drugs increase the accessibility of serotonin at synapses (associations between brain cells known as neurons) by forestalling the reuptake of serotonin by neurons.


How Long Does it Take For Prozac (Fluoxetine) to work

Because of its long half-life (4 to 6 days), the initial impact arises within two weeks to about a month.


You'll likely continue to take Fluoxetine (Prozac) for several months after you feel better. Most specialists suggest you take antidepressants for a half year to a year after you presently don't feel depressed. Halting before that time can make anxiety return.

Prozac (Fluoxetine) Dosage

Peruse the medication guide given by your drug specialist before you use Prozac (Fluoxetine) and, each time, you get a top-up. If you have any inquiries, ask your primary care physician or drug specialist before taking this medication.


The Prozac (Fluoxetine) dosage is determined by the patient's age and the treatment's goal.

The average adult dose of Prozac (Fluoxetine) is 20 milligrams, given by mouth once daily in the morning. If the symptoms do not improve after a few weeks, specialists can increase the dose up to 60 mg.

Geriatric or patients with co-morbidities may need to take Fluoxetine (Prozac) at a lesser dose or less frequently.

The maintenance dose of Prozac (Fluoxetine) is 20-60 mg per day, while the highest dose is 80 mg.

If you are using this medication twice a day, your doctor may tell you to take it once in the morning and then again in the afternoon.

An individual who is taking a delayed-release oral capsule to treat depression will take once a 90 mg delayed-release oral capsule a week.

If you're taking Prozac (Fluoxetine) in liquid form, use special measuring equipment to make sure you get the proper dose.

Use a measuring spoon instead of a household spoon to ensure you get the right dose.


What Should I Do If I Miss A Dose Of Prozac (Fluoxetine)?

On the off chance that you sometimes neglect to take a dose, don't stress. Take your next dose the following day at the typical time. Never take two doses simultaneously to compensate for a failed to remember one.


Prozac (Fluoxetine) Side Effects

Prozac (Fluoxetine), like all drugs, can lead to negative consequences in some people, although many people experience no or moderate side effects. As your body adjusts to Fluoxetine (Prozac), many of the most typical harmful effects will fade away.


Headaches, anxiety, insomnia, nausea, stomach discomfort, dry mouth, sleepiness, dizziness, trembling, yawning, lethargy, exhaustion, agitation, reduced sexual desire, difficulty or inability to climax, and ejaculation problems are all common side effects of Prozac (Fluoxetine).


Joint discomfort, swelling of the face, tongue, and lips, QT prolongation, convulsions, glaucoma, redness of the eye, irregular heartbeat, breathing problems (dyspnea), and serotonin syndrome are all serious but rare side effects of Prozac (Fluoxetine).


Prozac (Fluoxetine) Drug-Drug Interactions

Medicines that cause bleeding, bruising, or act as blood thinners may react with Prozac (fluoxetine) including, antiplatelet drugs and warfarin.

Taking MAO (monoamine oxidase inhibitors) alongside this prescription could cause a dangerous (potentially fatal) drug interaction.

Patients should avoid MAO inhibitors for at least two weeks before and after Prozac (fluoxetine) treatment. When to begin or stop using this medicine, consult your doctor.

For medicines that affect your heart rate, avoid taking Prozac (Fluoxetine) with them. It may interact with the medication and cause an elevated or abnormal heart rate.

Antipsychotics, other SSRIs, and serotonergic drugs like lithium and St. John's Wort should not be combined with Prozac (Fluoxetine). They may cause severe drug-drug interactions.


Prozac (Fluoxetine) In Pregnancy And Breastfeeding

Prozac (Fluoxetine) transfers to the breast milk in a moderate amount. There is a low risk of harm to the infant according to the limited data available. The general recommendation however is to avoid unless necessary during lactation.


It's significant for you and your child that you stay well during your pregnancy. If you become pregnant while taking Prozac (Fluoxetine), address your primary care physician. Try not to quit taking your medication except if your PCP advises you to.


Experts have associated Prozac (Fluoxetine) with a modest increase in the chance of complications for your potential child. However, if you don't get help for your depression while you are pregnant, you're more likely to have issues.


specialists, clinicians, and advisors

Texas Behavior Health is a mental health service that offers in-person consultations as well as online counseling. Learning about health conditions by listening to constructive podcasts is at the heart of mental health sayings.
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